19 Comments

  1. Shirley Peters
    May 19, 2011 @ 11:46 am

    Love this post, Jeffrey. It's like looking over your shoulder. I look forward to more of the same. Maybe you could do a weekly newsletter that I (and many others, I'm sure) could subscribe to? (Like Robert Genn's Newsletter..)

    Reply

  2. Carol
    May 19, 2011 @ 1:15 pm

    This is very interesting, and I'd love to see more in-depth articles about colors. I love seeing what colors other people use and it's always surprising to me how different they can be.

    Reply

  3. Elizabeth Champelovier
    May 19, 2011 @ 1:16 pm

    I am very interesting to know the technique of other artist

    Reply

  4. Caroline Savva Art
    May 19, 2011 @ 1:36 pm

    As someone who works with a very very limited palette (at most one of each of the primaries, a chromatic black mix, white and raw umber) I'd love to hear more about the qualities of certain colours. Though I am naturally drawn to a limited palette, I would like to expand it a little but whenever I look at all the colours out there I find it overwhelming, have no idea where to begin and often end up back where I started! So I think I'd find your posts on colours very useful :o)

    Reply

  5. Amy Tennant
    May 19, 2011 @ 4:19 pm

    Hi Jeff – I am always interested in learning the specifics about other artists' techniques and preferences and would enjoy reading your notes on individual pigments. Thanks for sharing this!

    Reply

  6. Curious Art
    May 19, 2011 @ 5:16 pm

    Intriguing article–please do the pigment posts! Although I prefer a limited palette generally, it has evolved over the years & I'm always curious to learn more about media.

    Reply

  7. Dale
    May 19, 2011 @ 5:42 pm

    Thank you! Have you read Color Theory Made Easy by Jim Ames? It is specific to watercolor, but the author uses a prism to test the colors and see impurities in the pigments throwing off other colors so that you can anticipate mixing. Thought that was cool. He went through several brands and lists the purest pigments.

    Reply

  8. Glendon Mellow
    May 20, 2011 @ 3:00 am

    Fascinating stuff. I'm a little surprised you don't have regular Naples Yellow listed – I use that in ev. Ree. Thing.

    Excellent post. Love to see more.

    Reply

  9. Jeff Hayes
    May 20, 2011 @ 6:07 am

    Thanks everyone! Based on response, I will go ahead with the project. One color a week seems like a pretty good rate, so that is what I'll aim for.

    Shirley: Something along those lines is certainly possible, though I think I'll work my way through this project before attempting anything more ambitious.

    Caroline: I think there's a lot to be said with trying both approaches. As I mentioned I sometimes use a limited palette, and that mindset is also really valuable.

    Dale: thanks for the recommendation!

    Glendon: Nope. Naples Yellow Light. All the way. I'm just a light-hearted sorta guy… Actually, I'm currently using a Winsor/Newton mixture, which technically makes it a hue. Once it runs out I'm probably going to drop a few bills on a tube of Genuine Naples Yellow – any recommendations?

    Reply

  10. Beth
    May 24, 2011 @ 2:32 am

    I see you've already decided, but I was going to tell you that I vote YES.

    Thank you for sharing this information.

    Reply

  11. Jeff Hayes
    May 24, 2011 @ 3:53 am

    Thanks Beth, your vote still counts 🙂

    Reply

  12. Dean H.
    May 26, 2011 @ 1:39 pm

    Score another affirmative, Jeffery.
    I'd love to hear more. I need to expand my palette.

    Love your work.

    Reply

  13. Jeff Hayes
    May 26, 2011 @ 7:11 pm

    Thanks Dean – the first one is just published!

    Reply

  14. Carolina
    May 30, 2011 @ 1:58 am

    Hi Jeffrey, this is so interesting, thanks for taking the time to develop this subject for all of us, it's much appreciated!

    Reply

  15. Candy Barr
    May 30, 2011 @ 2:58 am

    WOW Jeffrey, Who knew there were so many colors to the palette with names? I'm so unscientific, that was lovely to read about the painting tradition in so methodical terms. Thanks for all your efforts that you share!

    Reply

  16. Jeff Hayes
    May 30, 2011 @ 4:09 pm

    You're welcome!

    Reply

  17. Kristin
    March 24, 2012 @ 5:23 pm

    Your style is very refreshing and I am intrigued by your palette.
    How do you keep your paints in such small spots?
    How long do you keep your paints on the palette or do you refresh them each day?
    Are you going to do more posts on the individual colors?

    Thanks!

    Reply

  18. Jeff Hayes
    March 27, 2012 @ 2:20 pm

    Thanks Kristin. I simply squeeze very lightly on each tube, and that gets the small amount of paint on the palette. I generally need to refresh the paints every other day at the very most. I doubt I'll be doing any more of the individual color discussions in the near future – it was eating into painting time, which is my priority.

    Reply

  19. jason.b maxon
    June 9, 2014 @ 7:46 am

    i like this kinds of acceptation arts.Keep it up

    Reply

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